Geobiology

Ann Pearson

Ann Pearson

Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences; Harvard College Professor

Ann Pearson is the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences. Her research focuses on applications of analytical chemistry, isotope geochemistry, and molecular biology to biochemical oceanography and Earth history. 

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Hoffman G13
p: 617-384-8392, f: 617-495-8839
David  Johnston

David Johnston

Professor of the Natural Sciences and co-Director of Graduate Studies

Isotope geochemistry and historical geobiology. Re-animating ancient ecosystems and ocean chemistry using stable isotope systems, chemical speciation techniques, modern microbial experiments (for calibration) and theoretical considerations.

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office Location: Hoffman 302
p: 617-496-5024 f: 617-384-7396
Drew Muscente

Drew Muscente

Post-doctoral Fellow
Knoll Group

Before joining the Knoll Group, Drew received a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Geosciences from Virginia Tech. As a paleontologist and geobiologist, his work focuses on fossils of complex eukaryotes in the late Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic interval (~1000-450 Ma) of the geologic record. By studying the paleobiology and paleoenvironments of these fossils, his work aims to understand the rise of animal life and its impact on the Earth system.

Elizabeth Sibert

Elizabeth Sibert

Post-doctoral Fellow
Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows
Knoll - Pierce - Lauder Groups

Elizabeth is both a paleontologist and biological oceanographer. She is broadly interested in the evolution, structure, and function of ocean ecosystems. She uses a multi-proxy approach to study how the open ocean ecosystem has changed through time, with a focus on how it has responded to climate and biotic events in the past. Elizabeth works primarily with ichthyoliths, microfossil fish teeth and shark scales found in deep-sea sediments world wide, which preserve an unparalleled record of fish diversity, abundance, and community structure through geologic time. 

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