Post-Doctoral Fellows

Anders Albertsen

Anders Albertsen

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Perez-Mercader Lab, Rowland Institute

Anders N. Albertsen studied Chemistry at the Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark. He obtained his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the Center for Fundamental Living Technology (FLinT) under the supervision of Assoc. Prof.  Pierre-Alain Monnard.  The Ph.D. thesis, "Study of Replication Processes in Minimal Self-Replicating Systems", was defended in December 2013. Anders joined the Perez-Mercader group in February 2014.

Research interests: Self-Assembly, Vesicles, Micelles, Reverse Micelles, Nanoreactors, Reactivity of Membranes, Membrane Coupled Reactions, Encapsulated Reactions, Compartmentalization of Living Systems, the Origin of Life, and Synthetic Biology.

Jia Chen

Jia Chen

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Wofsy

Jia Chen joined Prof. Wofsy’s group in Aug. 2011 with a research interest in urban greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions. She works on a method to determine the rates of emissions in cities by measuring the column-averaged gas concentration in the atmosphere, using the sun as light source. This work involves development of compact, mobile, sun-tracking Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), atmospheric modeling using mesoscale models (e.g., WRF-GHG), and network design.

Jia Chen received her PhD in electrical engineering at Technische Universität München (Prof. Amann's group) in collaboration with Siemens. She developed hand-held laser-based gas sensors for industrial/household applications, with a focus on modeling of surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL), in-fiber based gas sensing, and efficient signal evaluation. She also worked on transmission method (CDMA) for Powerline Communication System in automobiles for her diploma thesis at Universität Karlsruhe. She is a recipient of the Graduate Student Fellowship Award of IEEE, ITG award of the German EE society VDE and holds several patents related to her PhD and Diploma work.

(617) 496-6247
Ben Cowie

Ben Cowie

Post-doctoral Fellow
Johnston

Ben is an isotope geochemist with diverse interests in the Earth sciences. In the Johnston Group, he is currently exploring questions surrounding the evolution of the atmosphere and biosphere over the most recent billion years of Earth history using a triple-oxygen isotope approach.

Ben received his Ph.D. from the University of Calgary in 2013 for developing a novel stable isotope approach for characterizing oil sands reservoir fluids, and was awarded a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship for his work. From 2002 to 2008 he attended McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada where he earned B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Earth and Environmental Sciences. His research during this time focused on compound-specific isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers with application to environmental remediation and monitoring. From 2006 to 2010 Ben was part of the Pavilion Lake Research Project team, a NASA Exploration Analog site, and an international collaborative research project. The project provides insight into the earliest life on Earth, and aims to change the way humans explore outer space.

857-253-1263
Matthew Egbert

Matthew Egbert

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Perez-Mercader Lab, Rowland Institute

Matthew Egbert received a BSc in Computer Science from St Andrews University, UK, before undertaking a MSc in Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems at the University of Sussex, UK, where he also earned his PhD.Since receiving his doctorate, he has worked in unconventional computing, robotics, and developing computational models of adaptive systems. 

Research interests: minimal forms of life and cognition; viability of dissipative structures; adaptive behavior; analysis and computational modelling of complex systems; the origins of life.

Eileen  Evans

Eileen Evans

Postdoctoral Fellow
Meade

Dissertation title: “Geodetic Imaging of Fault System Activity”
Advisor: Brendan Meade
Current position: Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University; as of Sept. 2014: Mendenhall postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. Geological Survey, California

(617) 496-4095
David Ferguson

David Ferguson

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Langmuir

David is an igneous geochemist and volcanologist who uses the chemistry of lavas to understand different process in magmatic systems. He is currently a member of Charles Langmuir’s research group, working on links between volcanism and glacial cycles in volcanic arcs.

He completed his MSc at University College London and PhD at the University of Oxford, where he worked on magmatism associated with continental rifting in Ethiopia. Before joining the Langmuir group David was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York.  He is broadly interested in exploring links between magmatic activity and other tectonic and climatic processes. Previous and ongoing projects include work on volcanic activity in Ethiopia, Chile and Hawaii. David’s research at Harvard is focused on geochemical and geochronological studies of volcanism in the Cascades, which involves collaborative work with scientists from the U.S Geological Survey.  

Jean-Sebastien Gagnon

Jean-Sebastien Gagnon

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Perez-Mercader Lab, Rowland Institute

Jean-Sebastien received his Ph.D. in theoretical high energy physics from McGill University in 2007, where he worked on computing transport coefficients in high temperature gauge field theories under the supervision of Prof. Sangyong Jeon. 

After his Ph.D. he joined the group of Prof. Mikhail Shaposhnikov as a postdoc at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausannne to conduct research on baryogenesis.  He later went for another postdoc in the group of Prof. Juergen Berges at TU Darmstadt (and later Heidelberg University), where he worked on non-equilibrium quantum field theory, transport coefficients and dark energy.  A common theme of Jean-Sebastien's research is (equilibrium and non-equilibrium) field theory applied to problems in particle physics and cosmology.  He is now applying field theory to chemical systems of the reaction-diffusion type that mimic some aspects of living systems in the group of Prof. Juan Perez-Mercader.  More specifically, he is applying dynamical renormalization group techniques to the study of fine-graining of those reaction-diffusion equations in search of clues of their internal mechanisms and functions.

Carling Hay

Carling Hay

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Mitrovica

Carling joined the Mitrovica group in the summer of 2012 after receiving her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Toronto. One of the main goals of Carling’s work is to answer the important climatological question:  what are the various contributors to the observed changes in sea level?  Her research focuses on using statistical techniques to better understand global mean sea level during current and past warm periods, and to develop the tools necessary to extract source information from historical sea-level records.  Understanding how past sea level has changed in response to rising surface temperatures is a critical step in our ability to predict sea-level rise into the next century and beyond.

Rita  Parai

Rita Parai

Postdoctoral Fellow
Jacobsen/Mukhopadhyay

Dissertation title: “Volatiles in the Earth and Moon: Constraints on planetary formation and evolution”
Advisor: Sujoy Mukhopadhyay
Current position: Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University

(617) 384-9335
Tereza Pereira de Souza

Tereza Pereira de Souza

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Perez-Mercader Lab, Rowland Institute

Tereza Pereira de Souza is a licentiate in Mathematics by the São Paulo State (IBILCE-UNESP) Brazil. She has obtained her Ph.D. in Biochemistry at the Dept. of Biochemistry, University of São Paulo (USP, Brazil). Thesis: "The analysis of ionic properties in anionic and zwitterionic micelles or cationic vesicles systems: a mean field theoretical approach." Later she worked as a post doctoral fellow at Prof. Pier Luigi Luisi group at Dept of Biology (UNIROMA3 -Italy) developing an experimental approach to the synthesis of proteins inside lipid vesicles using cell-free protein systems. She also worked as post doctoral fellow in the Prof. Alfred Fahr group at Dept. of Pharmaceutical Technology (FSU-Jena, Germany), where she worked with the entrapment of protein and ribosome inside of liposome, as well interactions of polyelectrolyte-membranes, physical chemistry of fatty acid vesicles, and vesicle formation investigations by freeze fracture and cryo-TEM.

Alan Rooney

Alan Rooney

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Macdonald

Alan’s research principally focuses on gaining an understanding of the interactions between tectonic, geochemical and climatic processes on a range of time scales. To better understand these interactions, he employs isotope geochemistry; in particular, the rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) geochronometer and Os and Sr isotopes. Alan’s research interests are spread across three main categories; 1) Proterozoic Earth history with particular attention on the nature of Neoproterozoic (1000 – 541 Ma) glaciation, large-scale tectonic reorganizations and eukaryotic diversification; 2) combining geochemical proxies with microfossil and sedimentological analyses from modern-day glaciated regions to better understand climatic variations and the external and internal forces acting on ocean-ice sheet dynamics throughout the Quaternary; and 3) improving our understanding of hydrocarbon systems through the use of Re-Os geochronology and Os isotopes to aid oil-to-source rock correlations.

617-495-2350
Gal Sarid

Gal Sarid

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Stewart

Gal Sarid joined Harvard as a postdoctoral research associate, at the department of Earth & Planetary Sciences .He works with Professor Sarah T. Stewart's group, on topics involving thermal and collisional evolution of planetary bodies and early compositional evolution in the solar system. Gal's  research mainly focuses on relating thermo-physical, chemical and dynamical properties of various small body populations to their origin conditions and evolution pathways.  The ultimate purpose is to understand how planetary systems arrange themselves and promote habitable conditions.

617-495-3637