Earth’s Interior and Surface

Roger Fu

Roger Fu

Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Research interests include the formation and interior evolution of the Earth and other planetary bodies.  Roger's primary tool is paleomagnetism, which he complements with geodynamical modeling. 

... Read more about Roger Fu

20 Oxford St.
Geo Museum 204B
p: 617-384-6991
James R.  Rice

James R. Rice

Mallinckrodt Professor of Engineering Sciences and Geophysics

Theoretical mechanics in glaciology, hydrology, seismology and tectonophysics; physics of earthquakes, ice sheet flow, fluid interactions with deformation and failure of earth materials

... Read more about James R. Rice

Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Pierce Hall 224
p: (617) 495-3445
John H. Shaw

John H. Shaw

Harry C. Dudley Professor of Structural and Economic Geology and Harvard College Professor; Department Chair

Structure of the earth's crust, active faulting and folding, earthquake hazards assessment, petroleum exploration methods, and remote sensing.

... Read more about John H. Shaw

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Geological Museum 215
p: (617) 495-8008, f: (617) 495-8839
FR

Frederick Richards

Schmidt Science Fellow
Mitrovica Group

I am interested in understanding the surface expression of deep Earth dynamics and structure. My past research has focused on constraining and modelling the impacts of mantle convection on surface elevations and landscape evolution. This work has helped to reconcile numerical models and observations of this so-called ‘dynamic’ topography, while revealing that convectively driven vertical motions may occur at rates of up to 100 m per million years. These fast-evolving perturbations have significant implications across the Earth Sciences as they may destabilise polar ice sheets, alter ocean circulation via closure of ocean gateways, and control locations of resource-bearing sedimentary basins. My current work aims to integrate geological observations with numerical models to constrain these dynamic topography signals and remove them from palaeo sea-level estimates. These revised values will serve as useful tie points to calibrate ice sheet models, reducing uncertainty in projections of future sea-level rise.

Geological Museum Room 203C

Pages