Earth History

Earth History

Roger Fu

Roger Fu

Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Research interests include the formation and interior evolution of the Earth and other planetary bodies.  Roger's primary tool is paleomagnetism, which he complements with geodynamical modeling. 

Research Group Coordiantor: Danielle da Cruz

20 Oxford St.
Geo Museum 204B
p: 617-384-6991
Rebecca  A. Fischer

Rebecca A. Fischer

Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Accretion, core formation, and composition of the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. She combines high-pressure, high-temperature mineral physics experiments with planetary-scale modeling.

Fischer received a B.A. in Earth and Planetary Sciences and Integrated Science from Northwestern University in 2009, and a Ph.D. in Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago in 2015.

Research Group Coordinator: Summer Smith

Office location: Geological Museum 204C
Mailing address: 20 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138
p: 617-384-6992
Ann Pearson

Ann Pearson

Department Chair; Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences; Harvard College Professor

Ann Pearson is the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences. Her research focuses on applications of analytical chemistry, isotope geochemistry, and molecular biology to biochemical oceanography and Earth history. 

Through study of the “how, when, and why” of microbial processes, her work yields insight about environmental conditions on Earth today, in the past, and about potential human impacts on our future.  Recent projects have focused on the carbon and nitrogen cycles and on pathways of lipid biosynthesis.

Pearson received a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation in 2004, a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship in 2009, and was named a Marine Microbiology Initiative Investigator of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in 2012. She holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography, where she was awarded the C. G. Rossby Award for Best Dissertation in the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate; and a B.A. in Chemistry from Oberlin College.

Research Group Coordinator: Milena Perez

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location: Geo Museum, Room 362
p: 617-384-8392, f: 617-495-8839
Daniel Schrag

Daniel Schrag

Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology; Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering; Director, Harvard Univ. Center for the Environment; Director, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, HKS; Area Chair for Environmental Science and Engineering

Daniel P. Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth history. He is particularly interested in how information on climate change from the geologic past can lead to better understanding of anthropogenic climate change in the future. In addition to his work on geochemistry and climatology, Schrag studies energy technology and policy, including carbon capture and storage and low-carbon synthetic fuels.

From 2009-2017, Schrag served on  President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.  Among various honors, he is the recipient of the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union and a MacArthur Fellowship. Schrag earned a B.S. in geology and geophysics and political science from Yale University and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Berkeley. He came to Harvard in 1997 after teaching at Princeton.

Geochemical oceanography, paleoclimatology, stable isotope geochemistry.

Assistant: Denise Sadler

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Room 433F
26 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
p: (617) 495-7676, f: (617) 496-0425
David  Johnston

David Johnston

Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and co-Director of Graduate Studies

Isotope geochemistry and historical geobiology. Re-animating ancient ecosystems and ocean chemistry using stable isotope systems, chemical speciation techniques, modern microbial experiments (for calibration) and theoretical considerations.

Research Group Coordinator: Sabinna Cappo

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office Location: Geo Mus 363
p: 617-496-5024 f: 617-384-7396
Andrew H. Knoll

Andrew H. Knoll

Fisher Professor of Natural History and Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Andy Knoll is the Fisher Professor of Natural History at Harvard University. He received his B.A. in Geology from Lehigh University in 1973 and his Ph.D., also in Geology, from Harvard in 1977.... Read more about Andrew H. Knoll

Harvard University Botanical Museum
26 Oxford St.
Cambridge MA 02138

Office location: Botanical Museum Room 50
p: 617-495-9306, f: 617-495-5667
Nadja Drabon

Nadja Drabon

Post-doctoral Fellow
Drabon Group
Joining Faculty July 2021
My research focuses on the habitability of the early Earth and how it was affected by crustal processes and changing surface environments. The study of the early Earth requires a clear understanding of present-day sedimentary processes as well as an appreciation of the non-uniformitarian character of the early Earth. My research integrates multidisciplinary approaches by applying stratigraphic, provenance and geochemical analyses paired with detailed knowledge of complex geology at outcrop- to basin-scale. Specifically, my contributions to the field focus on: (1) Furthering our understanding of the formation of crust during the Hadean and Archean, (2) evaluating processes of early life recorded in the rock record and studying the influence of impact-related environmental perturbations on the biosphere, and (3) characterizing the poorly understood tectonic processes in the Archean.
Emily Stoll

Emily Stoll

Academic Fellow
Drabon Group
Emily Stoll is an Academic Fellow in Dr. Nadja Drabon’s group. She focuses on using field-based sedimentology to understand what the Earth’s surface looked like over 3.2 billion years ago. Her master’s degree from Stanford University took her to Barberton, South Africa where she fell in love with the stunning rocks and intriguing puzzles of the early Earth. Her previous Archean research includes a provenance study incorporating stratigraphy, sandstone petrography, shale geochemistry, and detrital zircon geochronology, as well as a sedimentological-based analysis of banded chert deposition. Her current research continues to use sedimentary rocks of the Archean to explore the tectonics and crust of the Earth at that time
2019 Dec 04

BiSEPPS Seminar

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

GeoMus 204 (McKinstry Seminar Room)

Chengxin Jiang, Harvard University

Title: TBD

2019 Nov 06

BiSEPPS Seminar

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

GeoMus 204 (McKinstry Seminar Room)

Magali Billen, UC Davis

Episodic Plate Motion and Thermal Structure in Subduction Zones Caused by Slab Folding in the Transition Zone

Abstract: Although most present-day subduction zones are in trench retreat, plate reconstructions and geological observations show that individual margins experience episodes of advancing, retreating or stationary trench motion with time-variable subduction rates. However, most laboratory and numerical simulations predict steady plate velocities and sustained trench retreat unless the slab experiences folding in the...

Read more about BiSEPPS Seminar
2019 Oct 23

BiSEPPS Seminar

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

GeoMus 204 (McKinstry Seminar Room)
Daniel Trugman, Los Alamos National Laboratory
2019 Oct 02

BiSEPPS Seminar

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

GeoMus 204 (McKinstry Seminar Room)
Kali Allison, University of Maryland

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