Post-Doctoral Fellows

Samuel Pearce

Samuel Pearce

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Perez-Mercader Lab, Rowland Institute

Dr. Samuel Pearce is a Post-doctoral Fellow in the Perez-Mercader group. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Bristol, UK in February 2019 under the supervision of Professor Ian Manners. His graduate studies focused on the synthesis of uniform 1D and 2D block copolymer nanostructures using solution-based self-assembly protocols. He then moved to Harvard University in November 2019. Samuel’s research interests broadly encompass innovative synthetic approaches involving materials chemistry and self-assembly, with a view for their application in fields such as nanoscience and origins of life research. His current research focuses on the development of adaptive polymerization-induced self-assembly systems, with the aim to construct artificial cell-like structures capable of responding spontaneously to changes in their environment.

Angela Rigden

Angela Rigden

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Huybers Group

My research focuses on the transfer of water and energy in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Currently, I am investigating water stress in agricultural systems to better constrain estimates of crop yields in future climates. I am keen on using observational data from a variety of platforms including satellites, weather stations, and eddy covariance towers to model the interactions between the land and atmosphere.

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Louis Rivoire

Louis Rivoire

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Linz Group

Louis Rivoire focuses on convective processes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), on meteorological to climatological scales. By nature, the UTLS is subject to both tropospheric and stratospheric influences, which result in complex interactions between dynamical, chemical, and radiative processes. Dr. Rivoire seeks to better understand these processes as they relate to atmospheric phenomena with large human impacts, from storms to global warming.... Read more about Louis Rivoire

Elizabeth Sibert

Elizabeth Sibert

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows
Knoll - Pierce - Lauder Groups

Elizabeth is both a paleontologist and biological oceanographer. She is broadly interested in the evolution, structure, and function of ocean ecosystems. She uses a multi-proxy approach to study how the open ocean ecosystem has changed through time, with a focus on how it has responded to climate and biotic events in the past. Elizabeth works primarily with ichthyoliths, microfossil fish teeth and shark scales found in deep-sea sediments world wide, which preserve an unparalleled record of fish diversity, abundance, and community structure through geologic time. 

... Read more about Elizabeth Sibert

Terry-Ann Suer

Terry-Ann Suer

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Fischer Group

My research focuses on processes that occurred in the primitive Earth, during the period when core-mantle differentiation was ongoing. This is the era of the Earth’s history when major chemical reservoirs were established and the Earth acquired its bulk physical properties. I study the chemistry of different groups of elements through experiments carried out at high temperature and pressures using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. This apparatus is capable of simulating the extreme conditions that existed in a deep terrestrial magma ocean. The results of these experiments are applicable to questions regarding terrestrial planet formation, bulk compositions and volatile accretion.

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Michael Volk

Post-doctoral Fellow
Fu Group

Originally from Germany, I finished my doctorate at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich in 2016. I am interested in how magnetic fields evolve with time, especially in the early solar system during planet formation. So far, my research is focused on the fundamentals of remanence acquisition and can be broadly divided into three main themes. (1) the magnetic properties of materials associated with meteorites, (2) the effect of high pressure on magnetic properties of minerals and (3) the rock magnetism of ultra-fine particles. By understanding these fundamental recording processes, we will be able to have a more robust interpretation of the magnetic signals that are retained in meteorites. At Harvard, I will be able to combine my interests and work on the fascinating and complicated paleomagnetic record of Mars.

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Lei Wang

Post Doctoral Fellow
Kuang Group

I study theoretical aspects of atmospheric dynamics. My research aims to improve our understanding of the wide variety of scales in the atmosphere to bridge the weather-climate gap, especially the role of moist convection on high-impact extreme weather and climate events.

I have recently obtained a Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. My dissertation research is focused on the fundamental dynamics of a 20-30 day periodic behavior in the storm tracks – a newly identified climatic driver and early warning of extremes.

LM Ward

Lewis Michael Ward

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Johnston Group

I combine approaches from the bio- and geo-sciences to address big-picture questions about the history of life on Earth and the potential for life elsewhere. This research is motivated by a desire to understand how life and the planet have changed together through time to reach the state that they’re at today and how that might be different on other planets where the environmental context for life or evolutionary contingency differ. My primary research goal is to understand the origin and evolutionary history of major metabolic pathways that have defined the primary productivity of the biosphere, such as photosynthesis, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation. These metabolisms have fueled life on Earth for most of its history, but were not all present at the origin of life. Instead, evolutionary innovations have accumulated through time, gradually increasing the productivity of the biosphere to what it is today. Understanding the origin of these metabolisms can help us to understand how and when life on Earth became productive and began to drive geochemical cycles, and will help us to predict how life may evolve on other planets.

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Rakesh Yadav

Rakesh Yadav

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Bloxham Group

Existence of strong and large scale magnetic fields on planets and stars is one of the most fundamental problems in planetary and stellar physics. The turbulent motions of the electrically conducting fluids in planets and stars twist and churn the pervasive tiny magnetic field perturbations and give rise to much stronger and large scale magnetic fields. This process is called the Dynamo mechanism. Rakesh uses some of the worlds fastest supercomputers to simulate these physical processes and tries to understand how Dynamo works in stars and planets. The results from these complex magnetohydrodynamic simulations help us to better interpret the observations. Rakesh has extensively worked on modelling the dynamo in the Earth's core and in relatively tiny stars called M-stars (Proxima Centauri is one of them). At EPS, Rakesh is working to understand the geodynamo in greater details as well as to connect theoretical dynamo models for Jupiter with the incoming observations from the Juno space mission.

... Read more about Rakesh Yadav