Geochemistry

Geochemistry

Ann Pearson

Ann Pearson

Department Chair; Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences; Harvard College Professor

Ann Pearson is the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences. Her research focuses on applications of analytical chemistry, isotope geochemistry, and molecular biology to biochemical oceanography and Earth history. 

Through study of the “how, when, and why” of microbial processes, her work yields insight about environmental conditions on Earth today, in the past, and about potential human impacts on our future.  Recent projects have focused on the carbon and nitrogen cycles and on pathways of lipid biosynthesis.

Pearson received a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation in 2004, a Radcliffe Institute Fellowship in 2009, and was named a Marine Microbiology Initiative Investigator of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in 2012. She holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography, where she was awarded the C. G. Rossby Award for Best Dissertation in the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate; and a B.A. in Chemistry from Oberlin College.

Research Group Coordinator: Milena Perez

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location: Geo Museum, Room 362
p: 617-384-8392, f: 617-495-8839
Daniel Schrag

Daniel Schrag

Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology; Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering; Director, Harvard Univ. Center for the Environment; Director, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, HKS; Area Chair for Environmental Science and Engineering

Daniel P. Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth history. He is particularly interested in how information on climate change from the geologic past can lead to better understanding of anthropogenic climate change in the future. In addition to his work on geochemistry and climatology, Schrag studies energy technology and policy, including carbon capture and storage and low-carbon synthetic fuels.

From 2009-2017, Schrag served on  President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.  Among various honors, he is the recipient of the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union and a MacArthur Fellowship. Schrag earned a B.S. in geology and geophysics and political science from Yale University and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Berkeley. He came to Harvard in 1997 after teaching at Princeton.

Geochemical oceanography, paleoclimatology, stable isotope geochemistry.

Assistant: Denise Sadler

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Room 433F
26 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
p: (617) 495-7676, f: (617) 496-0425
David  Johnston

David Johnston

Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and co-Director of Graduate Studies

Isotope geochemistry and historical geobiology. Re-animating ancient ecosystems and ocean chemistry using stable isotope systems, chemical speciation techniques, modern microbial experiments (for calibration) and theoretical considerations.

Research Group Coordinator: Sabinna Cappo

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office Location: Geo Mus 363
p: 617-496-5024 f: 617-384-7396
TB

Thomas S. Bianchi

Visiting Scholar
Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Florida

My major interests are in the areas of organic geochemistry and biogeochemical dynamics of aquatic systems, with particular emphasis in estuarine and coastal ecosystems, applications of chemical biomarkers in paleooceanography, sea-level rise effects on carbon storage in coastal system, and chemical biomarkers of colloidal, particulate, dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon.

My research group has worked in estuarine and large river systems around the world with particular emphasis on the Mississippi River/Louisiana estuarine/shelf system, and the Changjiang River estuary. Some of this work has focused on the fate and transport of organic carbon source inputs to the Louisiana and East China Sea shelves, using chemical biomarkers as source indicators, as well as recent work on the paleo-reconstruction of hypoxia events on the shelf and relationship between carbon cycling. We have also been examining paleo-reconstruction of organic carbon in Colville delta sediments in the Arctic, using compound-specific isotopic analyses of fatty acids, to examine changes in carbon cycling during the Holocene in the Arctic. Finally, we have been recently using chemical biomarkers to better understand how carbon sequestration in wetlands or “blue carbon” is changing in the Gulf of Mexico with changes in the dominance of mangroves over marshes due to sea level change.

Geo Museum 367
2016 Mar 30

BiSEPPS Seminar

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

GeoMus 204 (McKinstry Seminar Room)

Dr. Piero Poli

Postdoctoral Associate and Seismologist

Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Read more about BiSEPPS Seminar

Laboratory for Geochemical Oceanography

The Schrag lab uses isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to analyze environmental samples for stable isotopic content.  This research yields information about global climate change in the geologic past, which can lead to a better understanding of climate change in the future.

2015 Feb 03

EPS 231

Repeats every week every Tuesday until Tue Apr 28 2015 .
2:00pm to 4:00pm

2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm
2:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Geo Museum 204

Isotope Geochemistry and Processes of Planetary Evolution

Professor Stein Jacobsen

2013 Dec 18

FAS Science Lecture - The Violent Origin of the Earth and Moon

7:00pm

Location: 

Science Center Hall C, 1 Oxford Street

Professor Sarah Stewart

The physical properties of our planet are intricately tied to the sequence of giant impact events that led to the formation of the Moon. The canonical giant impact model for lunar origin has been called into question by recent geochemical measurements of lunar rocks. Professor Stewart will present a new model for the origin of the Earth and Moon that reconciles the observations and highlights the importance of stochastic early events in shaping our habitable world.

2013 Oct 22

Solid Earth Physics Seminar

1:15pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Hoffman Lab, Faculty Lounge

Variations in off-fault damage and hydraulic properties induced by earthquake rupture

Speaker:  Tom Mitchell

University College, London, UK

Department of Earth Sciences

Pages