Oceanography

Ann Pearson

Ann Pearson

Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences; Harvard College Professor

Ann Pearson is the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences. Her research focuses on applications of analytical chemistry, isotope geochemistry, and molecular biology to biochemical oceanography and Earth history. 

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Hoffman G13
p: 617-384-8392, f: 617-495-8839
Daniel Schrag

Daniel Schrag

Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology; Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering; Director, Harvard Univ. Center for the Environment; Director, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, HKS; Area Dean for Environmental Science and Engineering

Daniel P. Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment.

Museum of Comparative Zoology, Room 433F
26 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138
p: (617) 495-7676, f: (617) 496-0425
Eli Tziperman

Eli Tziperman

Pamela and Vasco McCoy, Jr. Professor of Oceanography and Applied Physics; Co-Director of Graduate Studies

Eli Tziperman joined Harvard as a Professor of oceanography and applied physics in 2003.  His research interests include large-scale climate and ocean dynamics, including El Nino, thermohaline circulation, abrupt climate change, glacial cycles and equable climates; advanced methods of ocean data assimilation. 

EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Geological Museum 456
p: (617) 384-8381, f: (617) 496-7411

Laboratory for Geochemical Oceanography

The Schrag lab uses isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) to analyze environmental samples for stable isotopic content.  This research yields information about global climate change in the geologic past, which can lead to a better understanding of climate change in the future.

Brad Lipovsky

Brad Lipovsky

Post-Doctoral Fellow
Independent

 

I study Earth’s great ice sheets using geophysical data and mechanical models.  Most Antarctic ice loss occurs as ice slides off the continent into the sea.  Understanding ice sheet sliding is therefore essential to understanding the contribution of ice sheets to past, present, and future sea level rise.  Despite this importance, most ice sheet models still rely on ad-hoc sliding laws that omit important physics and exhibit pathological behaviors.  My recent work has employed more physically realistic frictional sliding laws.  Such sliding laws describe the resistance to sliding provided by a finite strength ice--bed interface.  The difference between frictional sliding laws and traditional, unbounded sliding laws has important consequences in the context of global change:  if the ice--bed interface has a finite strength, then its capacity to resist the forces driving ice loss is fundamentally limited.  My primary research objective is to quantify the processes that govern the strength of the ice--bed interface.

Two themes distinguish my scientific work.  First, I exploit an interplay between observation and theory.  My science always starts with observation.  My workflow then builds simple models from simple observations before iterating and creating a hierarchy of complexity.  Second, my work informs the study of climate systems but is based in solid mechanics, earthquake science, and geophysics.  This crossing of disciplinary boundaries allows me to leverage the best physical insights from diverse fields towards tackling new challenges in ice sheet physics.