Geobiology/EHAP Seminars

2016 Nov 14

Special Geobiology Seminar

3:00pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geological Museum 102)
Cryoconite ponds: implications for climate, chemistry and life on Snowball Earth"
 
Paul Hoffman
Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Emeritus
Dept. of Earth and Planetary SciencesHarvard University
 
*Geobiology/Paleobiology seminars are jointly hosted by OEB and EPS
2016 Oct 18

Paleobiology Seminar

2:00pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geology Museum 102)

The Geobiology/Paleobiology Seminar Series is jointly hosted by OEB and EPS

"Mass extinctions, the spatial fossil record, and how paleoecology may help save the planet" by Simon Darroch (Vanderbilt University)
 
Abstract:
A critical challenge for paleontologists in the 21st Century is deciding how to use the fossil record to generate tools relevant to the current biodiversity crisis - the ‘6th mass extinction’. Here, I argue that too much effort has been spent on comparing current rates of species loss with those extrapolated from the past, because species may not need to be extinct for ecosystems to collapse – they may only need to be rare. Instead, the spatial components of past extinctions (changes in geographic range sizes, as well as emergent properties such as beta diversity) may provide a better metric for comparing between modern and ancient crises. Lastly, I discuss evidence for an Ediacaran-Cambrian (~542 Ma) mass extinction – the ‘first mass extinction of complex life’. Unlike the Phanerozoic ‘Big Five’, this extinction may have been driven by evolutionary innovation, ecosystem engineering and biological interactions, providing a powerful analogue for the present day. Read more about Paleobiology Seminar
2016 Apr 29

Northeastern Geobiology Symposium 2016

8:00am to 8:00pm

Location: 

Geological Lecture Hall, Room 100, 24 Oxford St.

Mark your calendars--Northeastern Geobiology Symposium is coming to EPS!!

See here for the full schedule and specific locations for the reception, talks, poster session and dinner.

 

2015 Nov 10

Geobiology Seminar: "Mechanisms of the calcification response to ocean change"

12:30pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geology Museum 102)

Speaker: Christina Frieder (USC)

Abstract:

Interactions between organic and inorganic processes are fundamental to development and growth. The initiation of shell formation in extant shelled molluscs appears to be an evolutionarily conserved process. Nevertheless, the physiology that coordinates biomineralization can be hindered by adverse environmental conditions, during which shells also retain environmental information that can be probed through geochemistry. Possible solutions Read more about Geobiology Seminar: "Mechanisms of the calcification response to ocean change"

2015 Oct 20

Paleobiology Seminar: "Dating Microbial Phylogeny Using Horizontal Gene Transfer and Meta-Alignments"

12:30pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geology Museum 102)

Speaker: Greg Fournier (MIT)

Abstract:

Date calibrations for applying molecular clocks to phylogeny are typically provided by fossil or other geologically preserved evidence.  However, for the vast majority of the Tree of Life, no fossil record exists.  While the paleontological record of lipid biomarkers and microbial microfossils provides some information, these records are extremely sparse, and often ambiguous.  I propose that this limitation can be overcome in part by using Read more about Paleobiology Seminar: "Dating Microbial Phylogeny Using Horizontal Gene Transfer and Meta-Alignments"

2015 Feb 24

Geobiology/Paleobiology Seminar: "Biominerals and their amorphous precursors"

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (GM 102)

Speaker: Pupa Gilbert (UW, Madison) Radcliffe Fellow, Harvard University

Abstract: Organisms harness mineral chemistry and physics to form biominerals for their evolutionary advantage. How they do it is the question here. 20-nm resolution data reveal 3 distinct mineral phases in forming sea Read more about Geobiology/Paleobiology Seminar: "Biominerals and their amorphous precursors"

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