Geobiology

Ann Pearson

Ann Pearson

Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences; Harvard College Professor

Ann Pearson is the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences. Her research focuses on applications of analytical chemistry, isotope geochemistry, and molecular biology to biochemical oceanography and Earth history. 

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EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office location - Hoffman G13
p: 617-384-8392, f: 617-495-8839
David  Johnston

David Johnston

Professor of the Natural Sciences and co-Director of Graduate Studies

Isotope geochemistry and historical geobiology. Re-animating ancient ecosystems and ocean chemistry using stable isotope systems, chemical speciation techniques, modern microbial experiments (for calibration) and theoretical considerations.

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EPS
20 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

Office Location: Hoffman 302
p: 617-496-5024 f: 617-384-7396
Drew Muscente

Drew Muscente

Post-doctoral Fellow
Knoll Group

Before joining the Knoll Group, Drew received a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Geosciences from Virginia Tech. As a paleontologist and geobiologist, his work focuses on fossils of complex eukaryotes in the late Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic interval (~1000-450 Ma) of the geologic record. By studying the paleobiology and paleoenvironments of these fossils, his work aims to understand the rise of animal life and its impact on the Earth system.

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Elizabeth Sibert

Elizabeth Sibert

Post-doctoral Fellow
Junior Fellow of the Society of Fellows
Knoll - Pierce - Lauder Groups

Elizabeth is both a paleontologist and biological oceanographer. She is broadly interested in the evolution, structure, and function of ocean ecosystems. She uses a multi-proxy approach to study how the open ocean ecosystem has changed through time, with a focus on how it has responded to climate and biotic events in the past. Elizabeth works primarily with ichthyoliths, microfossil fish teeth and shark scales found in deep-sea sediments world wide, which preserve an unparalleled record of fish diversity, abundance, and community structure through geologic time. 

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2015 Nov 10

Geobiology Seminar: "Mechanisms of the calcification response to ocean change"

12:30pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geology Museum 102)

Speaker: Christina Frieder (USC)

Abstract:

Interactions between organic and inorganic processes are fundamental to development and growth. The initiation of shell formation in extant shelled molluscs appears to be an evolutionarily conserved process. Nevertheless, the physiology that coordinates biomineralization can be hindered by adverse environmental conditions, during which shells also retain environmental information that can be probed through geochemistry. Possible solutions… Read more about Geobiology Seminar: "Mechanisms of the calcification response to ocean change"

2015 Oct 20

Paleobiology Seminar: "Dating Microbial Phylogeny Using Horizontal Gene Transfer and Meta-Alignments"

12:30pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (Geology Museum 102)

Speaker: Greg Fournier (MIT)

Abstract:

Date calibrations for applying molecular clocks to phylogeny are typically provided by fossil or other geologically preserved evidence.  However, for the vast majority of the Tree of Life, no fossil record exists.  While the paleontological record of lipid biomarkers and microbial microfossils provides some information, these records are extremely sparse, and often ambiguous.  I propose that this limitation can be overcome in part by using… Read more about Paleobiology Seminar: "Dating Microbial Phylogeny Using Horizontal Gene Transfer and Meta-Alignments"

2015 Feb 24

Geobiology/Paleobiology Seminar: "Biominerals and their amorphous precursors"

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Haller Hall (GM 102)

Speaker: Pupa Gilbert (UW, Madison) Radcliffe Fellow, Harvard University

Abstract: Organisms harness mineral chemistry and physics to form biominerals for their evolutionary advantage. How they do it is the question here. 20-nm resolution data reveal 3 distinct mineral phases in forming sea… Read more about Geobiology/Paleobiology Seminar: "Biominerals and their amorphous precursors"

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